Birds In The Garden

Spring must be close because the birds in the garden are very active…and loud!

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Brown honeyeater

Last weekend I swear we were the location for ‘Kookaburra Wars’. Lots of males vying for the attention of, what seemed, oh too few females. I was shocked by just how brutal the dominant male was  –  three times I saw a young male knocked to the ground, and he still kept trying to strut his stuff. Being very territorial birds I guess it’s understandable but gosh, it was hard to watch.

All this action made me stop and think how lucky we are to have such a wonderful array of birdlife around us. In response I thought I’d start an on-going blog page that showcases the birds in our garden.

Yellow-tailed black cockatoos. Beautiful big birds that I’m grateful only visit occasionally. Often arriving in a flock of a dozen or more, they’ll land in a group of trees screeching at the top of their voices, snap off seed pods and branches with their powerful beaks and fly off. Very impressive but oh what a trail of destruction they leave behind!

Kookaburras. You just know you’re in OZ when you hear the cackle of the laughing kookaburra! It’s impossible not to smile when you hear that sound. I try not to encourage them too much as they have in the past got a bit too familiar and pinched my breakfast while I was eating it!

 

Rainbow lorikeets. These colourful birds just love the ice-cream bean tree (Inga mortoniana) when it’s in flower or fruiting. They arrive in flocks, chit-chattering in the early morning light.

Willie wagtails. What bossy, busy little fellows! They spend a hectic day skimming the lawn for insects, wagging their fantails and scolding anyone who gets too close. Sadly not even our dogs take any notice!

 

Honeyeaters. Rarely is there a time when a pair of honeyeaters cannot be seen foraging amongst the grevillea or callistemon flowers.

 

King parrot. We have a birdfeeder hanging from a tree outside the kitchen window. Unfortunately it’s right near the veggie patch and the parrots enjoy a birdfeeder entrée followed by a tomato main course.

Tawny frogmouths. Often mistaken as owls, they are common nocturnal birds. Frogmouths do not have the strong curved talons that owls possess. They are so well camouflaged, still and quiet, it’s wonderful to spy one during the daylight hours.

 

Looking forward to adding some more bird snaps when I can!

 

 

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